Exercise Your Dog Indoors

Helpful article from CesarsWay.com

8 Ways to Exercise Your Dog Indoors

By Nicole Pajer

Dogs need their daily exercise. Even things like it being too cold or hot outside, or the days getting shorter shouldn’t get in the way. Here are some tips on how to work out your dog’s body and mind indoors:

1. Run your dog up and down the stairs.

Using the stairs is a great way to tire out your dog. The steps add an additional challenge to a dog’s workout, as they engage different muscles than those used on a regular walk or run and add an extra level of difficulty with the change in elevation. Stand at the top of the stairs and throw a toy down to your dog. When your dog grabs the toy, call his name and have him bring the toy to you. After several rounds of this, he’ll be winded. Or use this time to help teach your dog how to properly walk on a leash (using learning tools such as The Illusion Dog Collar & Leash Set (Next Generation)).

2. Laser pointer.

Pick up an inexpensive laser pointer at a store and shine it back and forth across the floor. Watch as your dog chases the laser back and forth and works out in the process. Be careful to avoid shining the laser directly in a dog’s eyes, as this can cause damage to its retinas.

3. Set up obstacle courses.

Whenever Cesar enters someone’s house on the show, he looks around for things in the environment that can be repurposed to help the dog. Like using that old hula hoop for him to leap through or using cushions to create a tunnel for him to navigate. Map everything out and lead your dog through the various obstacles. This game will challenge your dog both mentally and physically.

4. Make your dog work for its treats.

Take a variety of your dog’s favorite treats and hide the around the house – behind doors, under tables, underneath rugs, etc. Your dog will be so busy tracking down his treats that he’ll physically tire out in the process. Treat dispensing toys are another great way to keep your dog busy and engage them physically as they push around their toys and try to get to the food inside.

5. Keep away and fetch.

Engage your dog in a good old fashioned game of fetch and keep away. These games keep your dog engaged, active, and help to release pent up energy.

6. Take a socialized outing.

Put your dog in the car (always remember to use a car restraint!) and head over to the nearest pet store. Walk your dog through the aisles, let him try out toys and sniff around.

7. Get your dog on the treadmill.

A treadmill is a great way to get your dog a dose of healthy indoor exercise. First, allow your dog to get comfortable with the sight and sound of a running treadmill. Next, place your dog on the treadmill and give him a treat. Turn the treadmill on the lowest speed. Give him treats to keep him on the treadmill. You may use the dog’s leash as an aid but never tie your dog to the treadmill. Also, standing in front of the treadmill and rewarding him with treats for walking might make your dog feel more comfortable. Once your dog is adjusted, you can gradually increase the speed to provide a more challenging workout.

8. Tug of War—But Be Aware of the Risks

With the amount of ropes and toys available that encourage tug of war, it’s not surprising that so many dog owners play this game with their dog. However, you need to be aware of the risk. It’s a game that brings out the predator in your dog and can be unhealthy for your relationship if you don’t have trust and respect to begin with. You need to have control over your dog’s power and instincts before you can engage in a healthy game of tug of war with them.

Pug Mysteries

From PugVillage.com

The Mysterious Pug

One of our Pugminded Facebook fans

Pugs do some mighty strange things from time to time, and this is the beginning of what we hope will be the answer area to some of the greater Pug mysteries.

Why does my Pug do figure 8’s and run circles when I take her outside to make? This always-entertaining dance is actually the Pugs way of finding just the right spot for it to make. It trots in a straight line until she finds a good starting point, then searches and sniffs in figure eights that become tighter and smaller until it finds that good place to make. Sometimes you get the feeling they’ve got this thing down to a science!

 When my Pug runs, it seems to run sideways, is that my imagination or is it really happening? It’s not your imagination! But it’s not all the time either. Most people notice this when their Pugs are trotting inside and down narrow hallways…So take a look and see how your Pug is running outside, as opposed to trotting down a hallway. Chances are you’ll notice that with room to run, and decent speed, your Pug will run straight. We’ve been told however that the cause of this is a matter of a Pugs perception in narrow enclosures such as a hallway, where a Pug’s field of vision sees both walls as being very close and thus slants in one direction in order to avoid hitting it.

Sometimes my Pug goes on a licking frenzy, licking my hands, arms or feet for long periods of time. What’s going on here? In a word…Salt. Pugs love salt and when we perspire, we leave a salty residue on our skin that Pugs enjoy licking off. And yes, our feet perspire plenty and remember, foot odor isn’t something we’re particularly fond of, but to a Pug, your scent is like heaven on earth.

 So what is that head tilt really about? The classic Pug head tilt is actually simply a matter of your Pug positioning its head and ears so as to take in whatever sound you’re making. All dogs have a version of the head tilt, though the Pugs is more pronounced and they are significantly more responsive to the voice of their owners than many other breeds. We don’t know why, but the theory is that it’s related to our reaction to them when they do this especially charming act…We Pug People eat the head tilt up and usually shower them with petting and laughter when they do it. They must have us figured out…A head tilt here and a head tilt there equals much attention!

Licking Lucy

Lucy

As I sit here working at my computer, I can hear Lucy (my pug) under my desk licking. Just licking. Not eating or cleaning her paws, just licking nothing in particular. This song popped into my head and I thought I would share the video…

Meet the Pug

Cute article from PugVillage.com

You’re walking your Pug down the street and you see someone approaching looking closely at your dog. Your dog is small, between 14 and 20 pounds, give or take a pound of two…It has a curly twisty sort of tail, protruding eyes, a muscular body, button ears, short legs and a solemn expression or a smile on its face, depending on the moment. The man stops you and asks “is that a miniature bulldog”? You break a smile and say “oh no, it’s a Pug”! The man wants to take a closer look and asks you if your dog bites. You pause for a moment, thinking ever so briefly at how funny that question sounds to you and say “Bite? My dog may lick you forehead to chin, he may even make a few strange sounds, but bite? Uh uh”. The man bends down to take a closer look at your little dog, and it’s curly tail wags slowly in a funny circular motion…Not back and forth, or up and down, or side to side…More like around and around. The man’s amused, noticing the Pugs facial folds and says to the dog “you’ve got wrinkles”. You watch and smile as your Pug gives this stranger a classic Pug head tilt at the sound of his voice and the man wonders if this dog actually understands him. He talks some more and sees the head tilt again and again, along with a variety of classic Pug expressions.

One of our Pugminded Facebook fans

“His ears and muzzle are like velvet” the man says, but “his coat is thick, does he shed?”. “Does he ever” you reply. “There’s hair all over the house, on the clothes and now that you’ve pet my Pug, you’ll have Pug hair in your house too. You might as well just get a Pug now.”

 The man hears the slight purring sound your Pug is making, or maybe it’s a snort, and asks if they make that noise all the time. You tell the man “all the time” is a relative term. You know your Pug snorts and snores while it, and you are sleeping. You know it makes these noises and others when you pet it, and when it gets excited. It cries a happy cry when you come home or say the word “walk” or “car”. That funny sound is enough to make anyone’s bad mood melt away. “I don’t know if I could live with the snoring at night” the man says. To which you reply, “I don’t know if I could sleep without that snoring”!

Being a Pug Person, you tell him a bit more about the breed. That it comes in Fawn or Black, but aside from color, a Pug’s a Pug. It’s a sedentary dog that likes to be around people almost as much as it likes to eat, but not quite. You talk about its good nature, that it is great with kids, gentle and passive. It sheds plenty, and that’s worth repeating for people with an aversion to vacuums or people with allergies. It plays with you when it feels like it, and sleeps long and comfortably on your lap or at your feet when it isn’t playing or eating. “Pugs don’t bark much either” you tell him, but they will do their level best to imitate a big dog in order to protect you and your home…”Pugs are funny that way” you say…”little dogs, that think they’re big”.

 You wouldn’t be a Pug Person if you didn’t take care to mention that Pugs have a bit of a stubborn steak to them. After all, it’s part of their charm…like the snoring. In short, you tell the man that Pugs are the best of dogs…Warm loving companions that own you, rather than you owning it. “Don’t let the solemn look fool you” you conclude, Pugs are The Clown Prince of Dogs, as entertaining and funny as any dog can be.

The Dirt on Clean

I came across this article on Dogster.com and wanted to share it. We lost our Pug, Oscar, to cancer that started in his mouth. Even though we were always careful about the cleaning products we used in the house, we had a cleaning service come in once a month. They also cleaned office buildings, and we never thought to check what they were cleaning with. Oscar was always licking his paws after the floors were cleaned. Once we put two and two together it was too late. It was a heart breaking experience and since then I am a bit of a fanatic about using nothing but non toxic, green products in the house. If you have pets, I encourage you to double-check everything in your home. If you have any doubts, get rid of it!

Six Household Products That Are Not Dog Safe


Many dog owners keep cleaners in their homes that are not exactly pet safe out of habit or ignorance of the bad effects they have on the household. Cleaning products with ingredients such as bleach, ammonia, chlorine, gycol ethers or formaldehyde can cause many problems in adults and children, but young children and pets are particularly at risk for things such as cancer, anemia, liver and kidney damage. Many toxic cleaners are also carcinogenic.

Several studies have been done on the dangerous effects of some common cleaning products. Many of these included data on pets which showed that Fido and Fluffy are not immune to chemicals and that many cleaning products are not pet safe. One study concentrated on measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in cleaning products. In it, the vapor pressure of various chemical compounds in cleaners was measured. Three cleaners, Pledge, Clorox Wipes and Lysol Disinfecting Spray, registered close to a thousand times more vapor pressure than a natural cleaner. This means that even when the toxic cleaners are put away and closed, the vapors left behind can continue to harm both us and our pets.

Some Toxic Ingredients and Their Effects on People and Pets:

Ammonia – Used in many de-greasers for ovens, glass and stainless steel, ammonia has a very high VOC, burns mucous membranes and contributes to asthma. If it is mixed with bleach, it creates a poisonous gas which can be deadly to small pets.

Chlorine – Used in disinfectants, toilet bowl cleaners and automatic dish detergent to name a few, chlorine is also used to bleach coffee filters. It can cause everything from dizziness to vomiting to laryngeal edema. Avoid this ingredient and be careful about letting your pet swim in the pool.

Glycol Ethers – Glycol ethers are found in many cleaning products that are not pet safe including glass cleaners, carpet cleaners and spot removers. It has been linked to anemia, lung damage and kidney damage in people and pets.

Formaldehyde –  The thought of a funeral home comes to mind when formaldehyde is mentioned and everyone can recognize the strong, nauseating smell. But it’s also used in products such as soaps and even some pet shampoos. It can contribute to asthma and is carcinogenic.

Some Cleaning Products That are Not Dog Safe

There are many, many cleaning products that are not safe for dogs on the market. Here are a few popular cleaners that contain some of the ingredients mentioned above as well as others:

Floor Cleaners – These include Pine Sol and Mr. Clean. Even if you manage to get all of the residue off the floor, the vapors linger and are dangerous to your pet. Try a non-toxic, pet safe cleaner instead.

Bathroom Cleaners – These include Clorox Bathroom Cleaner and Scrubbing Bubbles. Never use a continuous toilet bowl cleaner such as Clorox Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner. It is very dangerous and the temptation to drink out of the toilet is a quirk in many of our pups.

All Purpose Cleaners – For use in the kitchen and around the house, the most common toxic all-purpose cleaners that scream “Danger!” are Mr. Clean Multi-Purpose Spray and Formula 409.

Drain Openers – You may think that since this product is poured down the drain, it can’t be harmful to your pet. But the toxic drain openers give off dangerous fumes long after you’ve emptied them.

Glass Cleaner – It may seem that toxic glass cleaners are simpler products and are, therefore, safe but they are not. Instead of something like Windex, try a product such as Shaklee Basic H2

Laundry Detergent – It’s easy to assume that choosing a laundry detergent isn’t that important because the rinse cycle rinses it away. But there is residue left behind on clothes and pet blankets that can be harmful to your pet, especially those that chew on their bedding. Avoid detergents with toxic ingredients such as Tide and Cheer and try something like Get Clean Laundry.

Instead of using toxic cleaning products around the house, try one of the non-toxic and pet safe lines of cleaners. If you do decide to keep toxic cleaners, make absolutely sure they are put away. Put child safety locks on cabinet doors and put cleaners up as high as possible. Never use them when your pet is in the same room and air out the house after cleaning with them. Never leave any residue behind. But the warning signs are clear and you and your dog will be healthier and safer if you use cleaning products that are pet safe.

Taking the Lead

Wanted to share this article from The Daily Mail…I am sure these cuties will have no trouble at all finding a forever home. Very sweet.

Taking the lead: The guide dog that helps his blind best friend get around

This pair of pugs are firm friends with a very special relationship – one acting as the eyes of the other.

Franky acts as a guide dog to his fellow pug Elly, helping on walks or to find food and water because she isn’t able to find her own way.

The duo, both four years old, are inseparable, with white-coated Elly following Franky everywhere he leads. She sniffs the air to find her friend, the nuzzles into his side to trot along with him.

Special relationship: Elly (top), the blind pug, relies on her best friend Franky (bottom) to help her to find her way around on walks and to get food and waterSpecial relationship: Elly (top), the blind pug, relies on her best friend Franky (bottom) to help her to find her way around on walks and to get food and water

But their special relationship poses a challenge for RSPCA workers who are trying to find a home for them both together.

Vets nursed the duo back to health after they were found in poor conditions, and hope someone will come forward who is prepared to house them both together.

Elaine Buchan, manager of the RSPCA centre in Newport, South Wales, said: “This little duo obviously love each other very much.

Franky is extremely boisterous and playful and Elly is very affectionate and cuddly. He looks out for her and provides support while guiding her on walks or to food or water.

‘They both like to partake in doggy delights such as playing with toys and sniffing trees, but it is clear to centre they did not have that life before”.

Best friends: Elly sniffs the air to locate Franky, then nuzzles his side so he can lead the wayBest friends: Elly sniffs the air to locate Franky, then nuzzles his side so he can lead the way

Inseparable: RSPCA workers in Newport, south Wales, hope that someone will come forward who can offer Elly and Franky a home togetherInseparable: RSPCA workers in Newport, south Wales, hope that someone will come forward who can offer Elly and Franky a home together

Both Franky and Elly need operations before they can be rehomed, but their vets are confident that the dogs will be a delight to anyone willing to take them in.

Mrs Buchan added: ‘There’s absolutely no option of homing them separately as it would break their hearts and also be wholly impractical.

“They’re great little dogs and I’m already jealous of the lucky owner who will get to care for such a loving pair.”