For the Love of Dog

The Love of a Dog Helps Us Find Balance in Life

By Cesar Millan

I often speak of how important it is to keep body, mind, and spirit in balance, but am often reminded of how unbalanced we have become as a society. Every time there’s morning rain in Los Angeles, traffic falls apart, for example. Living in big cities we can forget how to stay balanced and live in the natural world. My clients remind me constantly—or they wouldn’t be my clients. Some are Harvard graduates, but they can’t walk a Chihuahua. Because you need more than intelligence to create a connection with Mother Nature. Many of us have lost that connection and it is reflected in our animals. Dogs are our mirror and when they’re not following us it’s because we’re not balanced.

The love of a dog is unconditional. Being unconditional, that’s a dog. Humans are very conditional. Dogs, accepting. You can look horrible, but a dog will look at you like you’re the most beautiful human being ever, because what he’s looking at is your feelings. Dogs have integrity. But many humans measure integrity materially, with money. That’s how disconnected and unbalanced we have become.

If I can help people to understand how simple it is to reconnect ourselves back to Mother Nature, then the payoff we get is community life, country life, world life. Because… if you transform your relationship with your dog and your neighbor does too, the whole neighborhood will feel it.

There are thousands of dog issues, but at the end, they’re all the same. Unfortunately, the world does not live in prevention mode, just intervention mode, ignoring an issue until it becomes a major problem. That’s because there’s no money in prevention. But the benefits of prevention are enormous—it gives us a balanced world, a lot of happiness, and a lot of health. That’s real integrity. Working with Mother Nature, not against her, is the best prevention in the world, rain or shine.

Don’t Leave Me!

Dog Separation Anxiety From Leaving Dog Alone

By Joe Wilkes

Dogs are very social animals, and they would like nothing more than to be by your side 24/7. But we know (even if they don’t) that dog food doesn’t buy itself, and that may entail you having to leave them home alone while you go off to bring home the bacon (and the dog treats).

We might imagine our dogs gleefully doing the Tom Cruise Risky Business slide when we shut the door behind us in the morning, but the more likely scenario is that the dog is experiencing some level of separation anxiety. This separation anxiety might manifest itself as anything from nuisance barking or whining (unpleasant for the neighbors) to stinky surprises left for you when you return home (unpleasant for you). If your dog is one to chew his feelings, you may also find some prized possessions or furniture vandalized during your absence.

What to do? Staying home to watch Judge Judy with your lonely pooch every day probably isn’t a pragmatic long-term solution. So how do you help ease dog separation anxiety so you can go about your day without feeling like a monster and he can relax so you come home to man’s best friend instead of man’s craziest codependent roommate?  Read on for practical tips to help ease dog separation anxiety.

Help separation anxiety by putting your dog to sleep (in a good way)

If you want a calm dog, it doesn’t get any calmer than sleep. Before you leave the house, make sure you schedule time for a brisk walk or a vigorous game of fetch in the backyard or nearby dog park. Having an anxious dog home alone is bad enough. Having a dog that is anxious and hyper is a recipe for disaster. exercise helps calm your dog down in two ways. Physically, it tires your dog out, so he might be up for a nap while you’re away; and emotionally, exercise can level out your dog’s brain chemistry in the same way a good workout can leave humans exhilarated.

Hire a dog walker for dog exerise

The best-case scenario is you can come home for lunch and spend a little quality time to break up your dog’s day. But if your schedule or commute doesn’t always allow that, it may take a village. If you have someone close by with pets, this is a great time to encourage some neighborly reciprocity, where you can arrange to let each other’s pets out when the other one isn’t home. You could also pay the going child-labor rate to hire a trustworthy neighborhood kid to come by during the day to give your dog a little exercise and company. A more upscale option is to hire a local dog walker to come by and provide a professional field trip.

More dog toys, less noise

A bored dog left to his own devices may act out by chewing up your devices. Boredom can be as much of a cause for acting out as separation anxiety. For this reason, it’s vital to leave out your dog’s favorite toys and anything else you can think of that he can use to entertain himself in your absence. Dog toys make great diversions. Aside from keeping him away from your toys, you’ll provide distraction for your dog during the day, so he won’t be as anxious about you being gone. One word of caution: don’t rely on toys with treats hidden in them. Once the dog eats the treat (which could be in minutes), he’ll grow bored and move on to the furniture.

Are two dogs company or double trouble for separation anxiety?

A common solution that many pet owners advocate is to adopt a second dog to keep the first dog company. This can be a great idea or a bigger dog problem. There are many variables to consider, including the size, gender, breed, and temperament of your dog and of the potential new dog. Talk to your veterinarian about whether a second dog is a good idea for your current dog and what you should look for in a new companion. Adopting a second dog can bring a lot of happiness into everyone’s life, but it isn’t a decision that should be taken lightly. You don’t want to be faced with a situation where you have fighting dogs or be forced to re-home a second dog who didn’t work out.

If you currently don’t have a dog, and you’re considering adopting one, think about whether your lifestyle is conducive to sharing your life with a dog. If you think your potential dog might be spending time home alone, that should factor in your decision when choosing your new friend. Look at breeds that are more low-energy and don’t need as much exercise or outdoor time. Better yet, consider adopting an older dog. Many older dogs have difficulty being re-homed, but can be a perfect fit for you. They typically are much calmer than puppies, and many are already housebroken. So don’t pass up a dog just because he’s been around the block a couple of times—it may mean he’s ready to take it easy.

Why We Love Pugs

Cute article from Pugspot.com

Why People Love Pugs

Why are Pugs so popular? Could it be their good looks or unmistakable charm? What is so darn irresistible about those Pugs? Ask anyone who has ever known a Pug and they will tell you there is no other dog that compares. But why?

Pugs are different. They possess all the qualities of a big dog in a little dog body. They are big enough to not be annoying and small enough for any size house. Perhaps their motto best describes them. Multum in Parvo – “a lot of dog in a small space.”

Pugs are affectionate. If you want a constant companion, he’s your man. They are happy to follow you around, lending you a helping paw. They make great couch potato buddies. Just bring enough snacks for you both. They are great bed-warmers. They will cuddle with you on the cold winter nights.

Pugs are fun and they are funny. If given an audience, they are sure to entertain. They are playful but not overly demanding. They are natural-born show offs. Nothing can make a Pug happier than being the life of the party.

Pugs have the grace and elegance sought after by royalty. Indeed, several notable nobles have owned Pugs. Just look at the list of royals they have possessed.

Pugs are friendly. They love everyone, from the mailman to the dog next door. They have never met a stranger. Pugs are excellent all around people dogs and animal dogs.

Pugs are sensitive. They do not like harsh tones. It hurts their feelings. They also are much attuned to your feelings. They can sense your distress and provide you with a comforting nuzzle.
Pugs are loyal. Unlike people, they do not know dishonor. They will be your friend to the end.

Pugs love kids. Well, most kids. If you want your child to have a perfect playmate they are “Pug”itively the best.

Pugs simply pop with personality. Never let it be said that a Pug is a boring dog. They are simply clowns in a dog’s body.

Pugs are cute. Who can resist their smooshie, squishy faces? Who could resist their snorts and grunts? Aren’t they the most precious little things you have ever seen?

Does anything else need to be said!?

A Walk in the Park

Spring is here! Time to get out and walk your dog. If you have some problems walking your dog, here are some tips…

6 Tips for Mastering the Dog Walk

By Cesar Millan

Here are 6 dog training tips on how to walk your dog and master the dog walk. When I’m out with my dog pack, I often walk about ten dogs at a time, sometimes even off-leash if I’m in a safe area. People are amazed by this, but it’s simple: the dogs see me as their pack leader. This is why dogs follow me wherever I go.

1. Walk in front of your dog.

Walking in front of your dog allows you to be seen as the pack leader. Conversely, if your dog controls you on the walk, he’s the pack leader. You should be the first one out the door and the first one in. Your dog should be beside or behind you during the walk.

2. Use a short dog leash.

This allows you to have more control. Attaching the leash to the very top of the neck can help you more easily communicate, guide, and correct your dog. If you need additional help, consider the The Illusion Dog Collar & Leash Set (Next Generation). Always keep your dog’s safety in mind when giving corrections.

3. Give yourself enough time for the dog walk.

Dogs, like humans, are diurnal, so taking walks in the morning is ideal. I recommend setting aside thirty minutes to a full hour. The specific needs of each dog differ. Consult your vet and keep an eye on your dog’s behavior to see if his needs are being met.

4. How to reward your dog during the walk.

After your dog has maintained the proper state of mind, reward him by allowing him to relieve himself and sniff around. Then you need to decide when reward time is over. It should always be less than the time spent focused on the walk.

5. Keep leading, even after the walk.

When you get home, don’t stop leading. Have your dog wait patiently while you put away his leash or take off your shoes.

6. Reward your dog after the walk.

By providing a meal after the walk, you have allowed your dog to “work” for food and water.

And don’t forget to set a good example by always picking up after your dog.

Licking Lucy

Lucy

As I sit here working at my computer, I can hear Lucy (my pug) under my desk licking. Just licking. Not eating or cleaning her paws, just licking nothing in particular. This song popped into my head and I thought I would share the video…